How to Report a Honeybee Swarm in East Jefferson County

Quilcene | Port Hadlock-Irondale | Chimacum | Brinnon | Port Ludlow and surrounding areas.

Swarms Come in All Sizes and Shapes

If you’ve spotted a honeybee swarm in East Jefferson County, here’s what to do and who to contact. Swarming is a natural process that occurs when a colony outgrows its current hive. A portion of the colony and the queen leaves the hive to find a new home, and this cluster of bees is called a swarm.

What to Do If You See a Swarm:

  1. Call Swarm Coordinator
  2. Stay Calm: Swarming honeybees are usually calm and gentle when swarming.
  3. Keep Kids and Pets Inside: Until the bees cluster onto a bush or other object.
  4. Wait for Most Bees to Stop Flying: After the bees have clustered and most have stopped flying, it’s generally safe to be outside.
  5. Maintain Distance: Ensure children and animals remain well away from the swarm.
  6. Don’t Spray or Throw Anything: Refrain from using pesticides, water, or throwing objects to “chase them away.”
  7. Avoid Interference: Interfering with the swarm can make it difficult for the beekeeper to collect the bees safely.

Who to Contact:

If the swarm is located in East Jefferson County, WA, please contact the East Jefferson Beekeepers Association (EJBA) Swarm Coordinator:

  • Call: 360-390-5118
  • Text or Email: swarm@ejbees.com
    Subject: Swarm

Note: If the coordinator does not answer immediately, leave your name, telephone number, and the swarm’s location. The coordinator is a volunteer and may not always be immediately available, but they will return your call as soon as possible.

About EJBA Swarm Response

  • This is a free service provided by the East Jefferson Beekeepers Association volunteers.
  • Volunteers use their transportation and equipment to remove the swarm.
  • Swarms collected become the property of EJBA and are given to members.
  • Important: EJBA does not remove hornets, wasps, or yellow jackets.

Together, we can protect these valuable pollinators and ensure their safe relocation.

Legal Notice:

Liability Disclaimer for EJBA Swarm Collection Service See: Disclaimer

 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About Honeybee Swarming

 1. What is a honeybee swarm?

A honeybee swarm is a natural occurrence when a queen and a large group of worker bees leave their current hive to establish a new colony. The swarm temporarily clusters in a bush or tree while scout bees search for a suitable new home.

 2. Is a swarm dangerous?

Swarming honeybees are generally gentle because they do not protect the brood or honey. However, keeping children and pets at a distance is best to prevent accidental stings and avoid interfering with the bees.

 3. What should I do if I see a swarm?

  • – Stay calm and keep a safe distance.
  • – Bring children and pets indoors.
  • – Avoid spraying or throwing anything at the bees.

Contact the East Jefferson Beekeepers Association (EJBA) Swarm Coordinator to report the swarm:

  • Call: 360-390-5118 or 911
  • Text or Email: [swarm@ejbees.com](mailto:swarm@ejbees.com) 
  • Subject: Swarm

 4. Why shouldn’t I spray the bees with water or pesticide?

Spraying bees with water or pesticides will agitate them and make it harder for the beekeeper to collect them safely. Additionally, using pesticides can harm bees and other beneficial insects.

 5. How soon will the beekeeper respond to a swarm report?

The coordinator is a volunteer and may not always answer immediately. If the phone rings several times, leave a message with your name, telephone number, and the swarm’s location. The coordinator will return your call as soon as possible.

 6. Will it cost anything to have a beekeeper remove the swarm?

No, this is a free community service the East Jefferson Beekeepers Association provides. Volunteers use their equipment and transportation to remove the swarm.

 7. Do beekeepers remove other stinging insects like wasps or yellow jackets?

No, the East Jefferson Beekeepers Association only collects honeybee swarms. It’s best to consult a pest control professional for wasps, hornets, or yellow jackets.

 8. Can I keep the swarm for myself?

Once the swarm is collected, it becomes the property of the East Jefferson Beekeepers Association and is given to its members. However, you can join the association if you’re interested in beekeeping and learning more about honeybee care.

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